2 February - in Hawaiian History [1887]: Princess Miriam Kekāuluohi Likelike died at her home in Waikīkī at age 36. The Aliʻi Nui was the younger sister of King David Kalākaua and the future queen, Liliʻuokalani. She was also the mother of Victoria Kaʻiulani Cleghorn who would be named heir apparent to the throne by Queen Liliʻuokalani in 1891.

3 February - in Hawaiian History [1874]: King William Charles Lunalilo, the sixth monarch of the Hawaiian Kingdom, died at his residence in Waikīkī at age 39. He was the sixth monarch of the Hawaiian Kingdom and the first one chosen by election. 
He reigned for a brief thirteen month before succumbing to tuberculosis.

3 February - in Hawaiian History [1874]: King William Charles Lunalilo, the sixth monarch of the Hawaiian Kingdom, died at his residence in Waikīkī at age 39. He was the sixth monarch of the Hawaiian Kingdom and the first one chosen by election.

He reigned for a brief thirteen month before succumbing to tuberculosis.

5 February - in Hawaiian History [1895]: The trial of Queen Liliʻuokalani for “misprision of treason” (the knowledge and concealment of an act of treason) inside the throne room at ‘Iolani Palace in downtown Honolulu. She had been arrested on 16 January of the same year after a failed military attempt to overturn the Republic and reseat her upon the throne.

The queen would later write, “The only charge against me really was that of being a queen; and my case was judged by these, my adversaries, before I came to court.” A Republic of Hawaiʻi military tribunal found her guilty, sentencing her to five years at hard labor and a fine of $5,000 dollars.

Her sentence would be commuted to imprisonment within a single room of ʻIolani Palace followed by five months of house arrest at Washington place. She was pardoned on 23 October 1896.

4 February - in Hawaiian History [1823]: The schooner “Active,” under the command of Capt. Richard Charlton, arrived in Hawaiʻi with Rev. William Ellis of the London Missionary Society and three Taihitian teachers including Tauā (Kauā). Tauā was chosen by Keōpūolani to be the personal teacher of her and her husband Ulumaheihei Hoapili (Hoapili Kāne).

When she returned to Maui in May of the same year with a small company of American missionaries, Tauā accompanied her and became one of the seven founding members of the first Christian church there - first called “Ebenezera, later named “Ka Ekalesia o Waineʻe,” and today called “Waiola Church.”

That church in Lāhainā in which Tauā was a founding member celebrated it’s 190th anniversary last year in 2013. (In the original church records book, his name is spelled (Kauwa) and he is listed as “belonging to the church in Huahine, Society Islands.”)

  1. Ulumaheihei Hoapili
  2. Rev. William Ellis
  3. Honor Guard at the burials of Keōpūolani, Nāhiʻenaʻena, Kaumualiʻi and other aliʻi within the Waineʻe Cemetery.
  4. Waiola Church, 2013

9 February - in Hawaiian History [1901]: The Beretania Tennis Courts open in Honolulu near the main post office on South King Street. The courts draw the world’s tennis elite to the Islands including Japanese tennis star Zenzo Shimizu who arrived to play a match in February 1922, causing quite a stir.

Shimizu was considered one of the two pioneers of tennis in Japan and had made the finals at Wimbeldon in 1920. He was ranked #4 in the word in 1921 and was a member of the Japanese Davis Cup team.

  1. Zenzo Shimizu at the 1920 World Hardcourt Championships at Paris
  2. Ichiya Kumagae and Zenzo Shimizu
  3. Shimizu and “Big” Bill Tilden at Wimbeldon. Tilden defeated Shimizu in the 1920 Wimbeldon finals 6-4, 6-4, 13-11
12 February - in Hawaiian History [1874]: King David Laʻamea Kalākaua is elected as the seventh monarch of the Hawaiian Islands. The election, within the Hawaiian Kingdom legislature, came only nine days after the death of the previous monarch, William Charles Lunalilo, on 3 February.
For a look at the diplomacy of King Kalākaua, check out the article by former diplomat and current UH Professor, Niklaus Schweizer “King Kalakaua: An International Perspective” in volume 25 (1991) of the Hawaiian Journal of History https://evols.library.manoa.hawaii.edu/handle/10524/539

12 February - in Hawaiian History [1874]: King David Laʻamea Kalākaua is elected as the seventh monarch of the Hawaiian Islands. The election, within the Hawaiian Kingdom legislature, came only nine days after the death of the previous monarch, William Charles Lunalilo, on 3 February.

For a look at the diplomacy of King Kalākaua, check out the article by former diplomat and current UH Professor, Niklaus Schweizer “King Kalakaua: An International Perspective” in volume 25 (1991) of the Hawaiian Journal of History https://evols.library.manoa.hawaii.edu/handle/10524/539